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#JesuisCharlie

16.11.2015
- Languages: it
This new terrorism is in part the product of a profound change in European societies. The conflicts and political violence generated by the problematic reality of political Islam question the world view and the definition of political order of a society increasingly characterised by the coexistence of multiple social identities and heterogeneous cultures within a given territory. Why have we got to this point?
30.06.2015
- Languages: de
If we are reluctant to express ourselves, it’s because we lack words for our own liberal democratic community.
25.03.2015
- Languages: it

Thinking back to the terrorist attack on the “Charlie Hebdo” newsroom two months on, the feelings of horror remain.

23.03.2015
The growing consensus that violent sanction of views considered aberrant or immoral is innate to Islamic revelation, ironically enough, mirrors the literalist intolerance of those that we condemn, and overlooks the fact that all religious doctrine contains elements of such intolerance, whether Christian, Judaic or Islamic, or even Hindu or Buddhist.
09.03.2015
- Languages: it
The most extremist Islamists should not fear Houllebecq's book, nor should its author be added to the existing list of 'fatwas' – despite the fact that Houllebecq is known to have said all sorts of things about Islam in the past. And neither should we think of this book as a step in Houellebecq's redemption on the road to the Mecca. Quite the opposite. His dislike of the Religions of the Book, and of the Muslim world, remain unchanged.
02.03.2015
- Languages: de
Can Islam be reformed? Can it fit in with the secular orders of European societies? Are Muslims integrated into Europe? Can't Muslims take a joke? These are however the wrong questions, since they fail to recognise, let alone break down, the hegemonic framework within which they are posed; a framework that measures the compatibility, or lack of it, of Muslims with a liberal and secular order.
24.02.2015
- Languages: it
In the context of Islam even if dichotomous, Good and Evil have the same root. Only through absolute submission to the Divine commandments can Muslims hope that ‘the second death shall do them no harm’. It is easy to understand how the blasphemy and offence of God or his last prophet Muhammad, made explicit in the cartoons of "Charlie Hebdo", cannot be forgiven by the Muslims.
23.02.2015
- Languages: de
Given the way in which society is constantly changing, it is the emotive issues associated with the relationship of state and religion that tend to recur, reappearing each time with some new, interesting twist. The recent terrorist atrocities in Paris have accordingly added to existing German discussion over the integration of Muslims in Western societies, reviving debate about extreme religious criticism and the application of criminal law. In Germany discussion of the acceptability of extreme religious criticism is not simply a matter of aesthetics or even of good taste, but of the law
13.02.2015
- Languages: it
The "Charlie Hebdo" cartoons however have brought the focus of attention onto the kind of behaviour to be adopted towards religion. If, for some people it seems natural that the freedom of expression should apply also to this sphere, for others, this should be avoided in the name of 'respect', a concept that alludes to the acknowledgement of the value of someone or something. In this perspective, 'satire' directed to at religion quickly slides into something different and becomes 'insult'.
09.02.2015
Many have wondered what exactly 'Charlie' stands for. Does identification with 'Charlie' signify an ultimately abstract endorsement of freedom of expression? How does it relate to the work published by the satirical magazine, and particularly its portrayals of Islam and Muslims, which – it should be mentioned – had received much less public support in France in the last couple of years?